Leadership

Do You Understand the 5 Roles of Leadership?

Insight.jpg

Are there universally shared leadership characteristics? Experts estimate that 50 to 85 percent of leadership characteristics are found in all effective leaders. The missing variables are personal situations and internal influences (drive, ambition, etc.).

You can improve your leadership abilities by focusing on the main characteristics that define those who succeed at leading others. (Last Blog)  The Leadership Code’s five-rule framework represents 60 to 70 percent of fundamentally effective leadership. While there may be variances in strategy, vision and individual job requirements, the rules are designed as a foundation for effective leadership across all industries.

Most people are naturally predisposed to excel in one or two of the five leadership roles:

1.      Strategist

2.      Executor

3.      Talent manager

4.       Human-capital developer

5.      Personal proficiency

Some are big-picture strategists and future-oriented, while others love getting things done or engaging people for high performance.

If you’re in a more senior role, you’ll need to branch out from your predisposed areas of excellence. You’ll be required to master all of the first four roles or surround yourself with people who can fill in the gaps for you.

The last role, personal proficiency, is the foundation for improving skills in the first four roles. Personal proficiency will help you become a more rounded leader. It is the only one that cannot be delegated, although having an executive coach (Coach4ldrs.com) can help you develop more rapidly.

At the heart of leadership effectiveness is the ability to continually learn and enhance your personal effectiveness. We are called to grow into the people God has called us to be!

You are not solely defined by what you do or know. In fact, there’s a lot you don’t know about yourself because everyone has limited vision and blind spots. We err in thinking. We jump to conclusions. We have poor communication habits that could definitely improve. Personal proficiency takes time, vigilance and help from others. Again, awareness is huge. Who helps you see reality?

Who you are as a leader has everything to do with how much you can accomplish with and through other people. In The Leadership Challenge, James Kouzes and Barry Posner cite three reasons why people follow someone:

1.      Integrity

2.      Competency

3.      Forward thinking


Leaders are learners, and their classroom is everywhere. We learn from our mistakes, successes, books, coworkers, bosses, friends and life itself. Leaders are passionate about their beliefs and interests, willing to examine them at every occasion.

Leaders know what matters to them. They inspire loyalty and goodwill in others because they  act with integrity and trust. They can be bold and courageous because they know what matters most. This helps them tolerate ambiguity, uncertainty and crises.

The Leadership Code provides four summary observations:

1.      All leaders must excel at personal proficiency. Without a foundation of trust and credibility, you cannot ask others to follow you.

2.      All leaders must have one towering strength. Most successful leaders excel in at least one of the other four core roles. Most are personally predisposed to one of the four areas (i.e., their signature strength).

3.      All leaders must be at least average in their weaker leadership domains.

4.      The higher you rise in an organization, the more you need to develop excellence in the remaining domains.

How can you use this framework for leadership effectiveness to improve your abilities? And, if you're not working yet with an executive coach (www.coach4ldrs.com) review my web pages to see if it makes sense for you in your current career path to explore this option. I'd love to hear from you.

Call or text me at 714-267-2818

My email is marc@mocoach4ldrs.com

Who, What and Why of Leadership

How do these five rules for effective  leadership  from   The Leadership Code: 5 Rules to Lead By,     (Harvard Business Press, 2011)   Dave  Ulrich, Norm Smallwood and Kate Sweetman  fit in with other  leadership theories ? (See my previous posts here  Leaders Develop Others  and here  5 Golden Rules of Leadership Leadership  has evolved from the military models of centuries ago to contemporary theories of  scientific management ,  situational leadership ,  servant leadership  and other widely discussed  styles .  The primary principles of effective leadership nonetheless remain consistent. Without effective leadership skills, no one will follow you.  Here’s a look at some traditional leadership theories, based on the key questions journalists ask to uncover a story: who, what, when, where, why and how.   1.  Who  is a leader?  The image of a tall man in a dark suit, impeccably groomed, comes to mind. He is authoritative, with a firm handshake, warm smile and steady gaze. For a long time, leaders were sought for their physical traits: height, gender, heritage, education and speaking style. This approach proved to be based on false assumptions, but such prejudices still exist in the C-suites. Today, it’s called  executive presence . The criteria have changed (somewhat), but people are still influenced by looks.   2.  How  do leaders act?  Leadership has been defined by  behavioral style . There are six distinct leadership styles, according to  Daniel Goleman , Richard E. Boyatzis and Annie McKee, authors of     Primal Leadership: Realizing the Power of Emotional Intelligence  :  ·  Directive : Immediate compliance. Giving orders, or telling someone what to do.  ·  Visionary : Providing long-term direction and vision for employees. Inspiring action through personal and professional vision.  ·  Affiliative : Creating harmony among employees and between the manager and employees. Fostering a harmonious environment.  ·  Participative : Building commitment among employees and generating new ideas. Collaborating to achieve a goal.  ·  Pace-setting : Accomplishing tasks to high standards of excellence. Setting high standards that challenge the team to keep up.  ·  Coaching : Long-term professional development of employees. Determining how to help people address their strengths and challenges. Creating a development plan to help them achieve their potential.  In general, these styles define a leader by how he or she behaves. Do you “take charge” or “take care”? Leaders exhibit a preferred style, but the effective ones can be both soft and hard; they’re flexible in switching between managing tasks and caring about people.   3.  When  and  where  do leaders focus on the person or task?  This question relates to   situational leadership  . The appropriate leadership style depends on understanding situational context and specifics.   4.  What  do leaders know and do?  What are the key  leadership competencies ? What core body of knowledge, skills and values define successful leaders? In this leadership model, the focus is on both the situation and the business strategy.   5.  Why  does leadership matter?    Some leadership theorists have shifted away from competencies to focus on results. Leadership is about getting the right results in the right way. Leaders need to achieve a  balanced scorecard  of employee, customer, investor and organizational results to provide sustainable results.  Perhaps this has reminded you of MBA courses and leadership workshops you've sat through, or business books that have claimed to have the secret to unlock leadership magic. It's tempting to buy into yet again another fad-du-jour.  But if you want to seriously improve your leadership abilities, you can't read a book and simply start to apply new skills. Leadership is more about relationships and character. That can't be developed on your own. The beginning is self-awareness. One of the most effective ways to grow your self-awareness and leadership abilities is with an executive coach.  Is now the time to take the next step in your development?  I coach leaders seeking to maximize their potential. I know coaches of excellence with the same mission. My differentiator is the intentional anchoring of Jesus in the leadership growth journey.   Click here  to get on my calendar to see if MO Leadership Coaching is the right tool for you.

How do these five rules for effective leadership from The Leadership Code: 5 Rules to Lead By, (Harvard Business Press, 2011) Dave Ulrich, Norm Smallwood and Kate Sweetman fit in with other leadership theories? (See my previous posts here Leaders Develop Others and here 5 Golden Rules of Leadership Leadership has evolved from the military models of centuries ago to contemporary theories of scientific management, situational leadership, servant leadership and other widely discussed styles.

The primary principles of effective leadership nonetheless remain consistent. Without effective leadership skills, no one will follow you.

Here’s a look at some traditional leadership theories, based on the key questions journalists ask to uncover a story: who, what, when, where, why and how.

1. Who is a leader? The image of a tall man in a dark suit, impeccably groomed, comes to mind. He is authoritative, with a firm handshake, warm smile and steady gaze. For a long time, leaders were sought for their physical traits: height, gender, heritage, education and speaking style. This approach proved to be based on false assumptions, but such prejudices still exist in the C-suites. Today, it’s called executive presence. The criteria have changed (somewhat), but people are still influenced by looks.

2. How do leaders act? Leadership has been defined by behavioral style. There are six distinct leadership styles, according to Daniel Goleman, Richard E. Boyatzis and Annie McKee, authors of Primal Leadership: Realizing the Power of Emotional Intelligence:

· Directive: Immediate compliance. Giving orders, or telling someone what to do.

· Visionary: Providing long-term direction and vision for employees. Inspiring action through personal and professional vision.

· Affiliative: Creating harmony among employees and between the manager and employees. Fostering a harmonious environment.

· Participative: Building commitment among employees and generating new ideas. Collaborating to achieve a goal.

· Pace-setting: Accomplishing tasks to high standards of excellence. Setting high standards that challenge the team to keep up.

· Coaching: Long-term professional development of employees. Determining how to help people address their strengths and challenges. Creating a development plan to help them achieve their potential.

In general, these styles define a leader by how he or she behaves. Do you “take charge” or “take care”? Leaders exhibit a preferred style, but the effective ones can be both soft and hard; they’re flexible in switching between managing tasks and caring about people.

3. When and where do leaders focus on the person or task? This question relates to situational leadership. The appropriate leadership style depends on understanding situational context and specifics.

4. What do leaders know and do? What are the key leadership competencies? What core body of knowledge, skills and values define successful leaders? In this leadership model, the focus is on both the situation and the business strategy.

5. Why does leadership matter? Some leadership theorists have shifted away from competencies to focus on results. Leadership is about getting the right results in the right way. Leaders need to achieve a balanced scorecard of employee, customer, investor and organizational results to provide sustainable results.

Perhaps this has reminded you of MBA courses and leadership workshops you've sat through, or business books that have claimed to have the secret to unlock leadership magic. It's tempting to buy into yet again another fad-du-jour.

But if you want to seriously improve your leadership abilities, you can't read a book and simply start to apply new skills. Leadership is more about relationships and character. That can't be developed on your own. The beginning is self-awareness. One of the most effective ways to grow your self-awareness and leadership abilities is with an executive coach.

Is now the time to take the next step in your development?

I coach leaders seeking to maximize their potential. I know coaches of excellence with the same mission. My differentiator is the intentional anchoring of Jesus in the leadership growth journey.

Click here to get on my calendar to see if MO Leadership Coaching is the right tool for you.

Leaders Develop Others and Themselves

number 3.jpg

I'm reviewing ideas in the book The Leadership Code: 5 Rules to Lead By,, (Harvard Business Press, 2011) Dave Ulrich, Norm Smallwood and Kate Sweetman.

All leaders who want to be effective should function well as a strategist (shape the future), an executor (get things done), a talent manager (bring out the best in people), and as a human capitol developer (prepare for the next generation). And, as a foundation for these roles, an effective leader must excel at their own personal proficiency (they must invest in their own learning and development in order to lead others well).

In a previous post ( 5 Golden Rules – Part 1) I reviewed

Rule 1: Shape the future and

Rule 2: Make things happen. Here are rules 3, 4, and 5.

Rule 3: Engage today’s talent. As a talent manager, you’re in charge of optimizing teams’ performance. You must answer the question, “Who goes with us on our business journey?” You need to know how to identify, build and engage talent for immediate results.

How can you bring out the best in people? Do you know which skills are required and where to find talent in your organization? How can you best develop and engage people, guaranteeing that they turn in their best efforts?

When you excel at talent management, you generate personal, professional and organizational loyalty. Talent thrives when you provide nurturing and developmental opportunities. Part of this role of talent engagement and development easily connects to a Biblical worldview that to who much is given, much is expected.     Luke 12:48

Rule 4: Build the next generation.

As a human-capital developer, you’ll need to plan for the next generation. You must answer the question, “Who stays and sustains the organization for the next generation?” Just as talent managers ensure shorter-term results through people, human-capital developers make sure the organization has the longer-term competencies and people required for future strategic success.

This rule requires you to think in terms of building a workforce plan focused on future talent, developing that talent and helping employees envision their future careers within the company. You cannot overlook the fact that the organization will outlive any single individual.

Solid mentorship prepares the next generation to lead well. God offers the path towards wisdom and discernment. Titus 2:6-8 underscores the idea of teaching younger leaders the power of self-control.

Rule 5: Invest in yourself.

Leaders must model what they want others to master. Leading others ultimately begins with yourself. You cannot expect to influence followers unless you invest time and energy on your personal proficiency, individual strengths, self-awareness, and emotional and social intelligence. Leaders have the capacity and the responsibility to grow. The Bible directs leaders to stretch themselves by growth towards wisdom and discernment. (Hebrews 5:12-14)

Resources like Meyer-Briggs, DISC, The Enneagram and Strengthfinders are self-awareness tools that offer great growth opportunities. For leaders looking to move to the next level 360 assessments are a good investment.  Finally, if you’re not working with a mentor or executive coach (www.coach4ldrs.com) you’re missing out on one of the most effective ways to build your strengths and talents.

5 Golden Rules of Leadership

5.jpg

I've been reading The Leadership Code: 5 Rules to Lead By, (Harvard Business Press, 2011) Dave Ulrich, Norm Smallwood and Kate Sweetman. I like this book for many reasons, but especially because the authors do a good job of synthesizing leadership theories into a concise framework. Having a framework of the five major leadership functions makes it easier to tackle the job of getting better at leading people effectively.

I have been struck over the years by the silence I am surrounded by when I ask a leader to share their job description. Most leaders do work hard to help those they lead have clarity in their work by refining job descriptions for all. However seldom do leaders create their own.

All leaders have to function well as a strategist (shape the future), an executor (get things done), a talent manager (bring out the best in people), and as a human capitol developer (prepare for the next generation). As a foundation for these roles, an effective leader must excel at their own personal proficiency (they must invest in their own learning and development in order to lead others well). Here is a summary of the authors' ideas, put in the form of five "golden" rules:

Rule 1: Shape the future. As a strategist, you must answer the question “Where are we going?” for the people you lead. You not only envision the future, but help create it. You need to figure out where the organization must go to succeed, while pragmatically testing ideas against current resources and capabilities. Work with others to figure out how to move from the present to the desired future.

How informed are you about future trends, both inside and outside your field? How much time and attention do you allocate to future planning? How will you inspire your people with vision, purpose, mission and strategies? What does the Lord teach us about understanding the future?

Rule 2: Make things happen. As executors, leaders focus on the question, “How can we ensure we’ll reach our goals?” You must translate strategy into action. You’ll need to transform plans for change into measurable results by assigning accountability, knowing which decisions to manage and which to delegate, and ensuring that teams work together effectively.

This means keeping promises to multiple stakeholders. It also means ensuring that systems are in place for others to perform with the support and resources they need. Discipline is required. What does the Lord teach us about discipline? How can you help your people create their own high-performance results? Do you know when to step in or, conversely, step back?

I'm saving Rules 3-5 for my next post, but I'd love to hear from you about these two rules. Are you a person who focuses on the future, or who tries to become more forward-thinking? How adept are you at getting things done? Both areas are certainly important to being an effective leader and both can be improved by working with an executive coach.  (www.coach4ldrs.com)

A Godly Framework for Leadership

blocks with copy.jpg

Are leaders born or made? I could argue for both positions. In the work I do (coach4ldrs.com)  I've seen some naturally gifted leaders, and some who've simply worked hard and grown into excellence.

The real issue is that all leaders can improve. Whether you’re a seasoned executive or a high-potential team member, you can boost your performance in five crucial leadership areas. I've seen this happen. I've been working with high potential people who've made some amazing improvements through executive coaching. I see this in Jesus as our example as revealed in Luke 2:52 “and Jesus grew in wisdom and stature and in favor with God and man.

More than half a million business books deal with leadership acumen, but studying the most respected experts’ ideas reveals a consensus on the foremost functions required for effectiveness.

In The Leadership Code: 5 Rules to Lead By, (Harvard Business Press, 2011) Dave Ulrich, Norm Smallwood and Kate Sweetman have synthesized current thinking on leadership and developed a framework that blends idealism with realism. They’ve distilled leadership into five core roles, regardless of one’s industry or business environment:

  1. Strategist—Leaders shape the future. (Psalm 37:23-24)

  2. Executor—Leaders make things happen. (2 Corinthians 8:11)

  3. Talent manager—Leaders engage today’s talent. (Matthew 5:16)

  4. Human-capital developer—Leaders build the next generation. (Deuteronomy 6:9)

  5. Personal proficiency—Leaders invest in their own development. (Colossians 1:9-10)

 Having a framework for the most essential leadership skills will help you avoid quick fixes and business-book fads. While the scope of leadership may seem overwhelming, these five golden rules provide much-needed focus.

Leaders must excel in many areas: innovative strategies, long-term customer relationships, quality execution, high-performing teams and accountability. They need to manage people, communicate well, engage and inspire others, exercise keen judgment and decision-making, excel at emotional and demonstrate ethical integrity. It’s easy to get lost if you pursue the wrong priorities.

With a clear and concise framework that covers the entire leadership landscape, you can concentrate on how to become more effective and determine the best ways to develop talent. The Leadership Code offers five pivotal rules that lay out how the game is played. Knowing them enables you to modify your behavior and ultimately succeed.

There's no doubt that people can grow and develop their leadership talent; I've seen it happen in the work I do as an executive coach (coach4ldrs.com).  But what's needed is focused, deliberate practice on the things that count, that really contribute to a leader being effective. These five areas pinpoint the most essential things to concentrate on.

In the next few blogs I will dig deeper into the 5 areas and then who leaders are and how they act that creates a commitment to follow. As always when I study leadership, I find secular writers presenting godly concepts that are received in the marketplace as new thinking and seldom is there a connection for most to God’s Word. That’s because people seldom look.

The reality is God designed people and leaders and offers His way as exemplified by the greatest leader of all time. The leader that changed the world, Jesus.

What do you think about these concepts? Do they encapsulate all of the areas required for a leader to be effective? I'd love to hear from you, leave a comment.

Blame or Praise? Leaders and Failure

Admittedly, some mistakes are more blameworthy than others. As a manager, how do you make it safe for people to report and admit to mistakes?  Harvard management professor  Amy Edmondson  delineates a “spectrum of reasons for failure” in “ Strategies for Learning from Failure ” ( It is only $1.71 now on Amazon!! ), as summarized here:   Deviance : An individual chooses to violate a prescribed process or practice.   Inattention : An individual inadvertently deviates from specifications.   Lack of Ability : An individual doesn’t have the skills, conditions or training to execute a job.   Process Inadequacy : A competent individual adheres to a prescribed, but faulty or incomplete, process.   Task Challenge : An individual faces a task too difficult to be executed reliably every time.   Process Complexity : A process composed of many elements breaks down when it encounters novel interactions.   Uncertainty : A lack of clarity about future events causes people to take seemingly reasonable actions that produce undesired results.   Hypothesis Testing : An experiment conducted to prove that an idea or a design will succeed actually fails.   Exploratory Testing : An experiment conducted to expand knowledge and investigate a possibility leads to undesired results.  Notice how this spectrum progresses from mistakes that are blameworthy to those that could be considered praiseworthy. Imagine that, recognizing mistakes as praiseworthy. Is that the type of culture you are building?  How many of the failures in your business are truly blameworthy? Compare this to how many  are treated as blameworthy , and you’ll have a better understanding of why so many failures go unreported.  You cannot learn from your mistakes when the emphasis is on blaming. You cannot learn to become more resilient when your energy is tied up in assigning or avoiding blame.  Perhaps Procter & Gamble’s  A. G. Lafley  said it best in his   Harvard Business Review interview  : “I think I learned more from my failures than from my successes in all my years as a CEO. I think of my failures as a gift. Unless you view them that way, you won’t learn from failure, you won’t get better—and the company won’t get better.”  What about you? Do you learn more from failure or success? I'd love to hear from you, leave a comment.

Admittedly, some mistakes are more blameworthy than others. As a manager, how do you make it safe for people to report and admit to mistakes?

Harvard management professor Amy Edmondson delineates a “spectrum of reasons for failure” in “Strategies for Learning from Failure” (It is only $1.71 now on Amazon!!), as summarized here:

Deviance: An individual chooses to violate a prescribed process or practice.

Inattention: An individual inadvertently deviates from specifications.

Lack of Ability: An individual doesn’t have the skills, conditions or training to execute a job.

Process Inadequacy: A competent individual adheres to a prescribed, but faulty or incomplete, process.

Task Challenge: An individual faces a task too difficult to be executed reliably every time.

Process Complexity: A process composed of many elements breaks down when it encounters novel interactions.

Uncertainty: A lack of clarity about future events causes people to take seemingly reasonable actions that produce undesired results.

Hypothesis Testing: An experiment conducted to prove that an idea or a design will succeed actually fails.

Exploratory Testing: An experiment conducted to expand knowledge and investigate a possibility leads to undesired results.

Notice how this spectrum progresses from mistakes that are blameworthy to those that could be considered praiseworthy. Imagine that, recognizing mistakes as praiseworthy. Is that the type of culture you are building?

How many of the failures in your business are truly blameworthy? Compare this to how many are treated as blameworthy, and you’ll have a better understanding of why so many failures go unreported.

You cannot learn from your mistakes when the emphasis is on blaming. You cannot learn to become more resilient when your energy is tied up in assigning or avoiding blame.

Perhaps Procter & Gamble’s A. G. Lafley said it best in his Harvard Business Review interview: “I think I learned more from my failures than from my successes in all my years as a CEO. I think of my failures as a gift. Unless you view them that way, you won’t learn from failure, you won’t get better—and the company won’t get better.”

What about you? Do you learn more from failure or success? I'd love to hear from you, leave a comment.

Master of Godly Perseverance

master of perseverance.jpg

Leaders achieve success through their talent, intelligence, flexibility and wisdom. Those who overcome the odds often point to an even more powerful trait: perseverance. Have you mastered the power of perseverance?

As I wrote in my last post, (Developing Godly Perseverance)  perseverance can be learned and mastered if you make the commitment and accept the challenge. Learning means taking one small step to become proficient in the next one. No one can change his or her character in one leap. Here are two more steps to master perseverance:

Find your purpose

Many leaders lack purpose and fail to persevere in tough times. Maybe their focus is too narrow. Are you more concerned about your own well-being or the organization as a whole? Are you a limited decision-maker or a grand vision-maker? You have the opportunity to make a significant impact on many levels and on many people. Find your purpose there.

If you can’t find a way to love your work, seek ways to love the results. There’s purpose in adding value, making improvements and growing people. By deciding to be the best at something, you can have a calling with great purpose. Fuel your perseverance with this kind of thinking.

Remember, people are the ultimate “WHY” or purpose.  Align your purpose with God’s. God points us towards saving the lost, discipling the saved and helping the most-needy. Finding a bridge into these areas gives you purpose that will not only fuel your perseverance but fuel in forever.

Be positive 

A leader with a critical or pessimistic view will never muster the determination to plow through a crisis. If you lack positivity, you probably feel a force dragging you down, without understanding why. Fortunately, this can be addressed.

Become more self-aware, and catch yourself having negative thoughts or moods. Try to determine why you have these feelings, and create positive alternatives. A seasoned leadership coach (MO Leadership) can be of great benefit. Coaching accentuates the positive and leans toward it. Focus on the ways a situation can work instead of getting mired in negatives.

Foster Perseverance in Others

The best way to help your people persevere is to model optimal behavior. Develop grit and build on it. Use your authority wisely to instill organizational toughness. Developing a culture of perseverance maximizes people’s strengths and pushes them to achieve peak performance. An authoritarian approach is unhelpful, while a coaching, encouraging manner is powerful. Grasp how your leadership style comes across, and adjust to your people’s needs.

Leaders make great strides by helping their people understand that success is an accumulation of many ordinary jobs done well. They push people out of their comfort zones, giving them challenging assignments and timely feedback. Letting staff devise solutions ultimately engages them.

Organizations become persevering machines that weather the strongest storms when leaders build relationships and foster a good work ethic.

What do you think? Have you mastered the power of perseverance? I’d love to hear from you. I can be reached here marc@mocoach4ldrs.com and on LinkedIn

The journey of thinking about perseverance has helped me in my work and my leadership. In my next series I will explore: How to Bring Out the Best in People. Hope you join me as I think through the idea.

Developing Perseverance for the Godly Leader

developing perseverance.jpg

If you’re a leader who struggles with perseverance, you can adjust your mindset and behavior. I see this all the time in the clients I work with. (MOcoach4lrds.com) Perseverance can be learned and mastered if you make the commitment and accept the challenge. Learning means taking one small step to become proficient in the next one. No one can change his or her character in one leap so start one step at a time. The most important step is most certainly prayer. As you gain some perspective and see the gap bring that to the Lord. Areas to pray about might include: READ MORE

Harness wisdom

If you’re a seasoned leader, take stock of your experiences and draw upon what you’ve learned. Try to be more patient with long-term projects, and reject a rapid-reward mentality. Look back over your career and note what has worked and what hasn’t. Learn from past mistakes, and avoid any plans that resemble past failures.

By reflecting on past setbacks, you can see how your worst fears were probably unjustified. Likewise, future setbacks won’t be fatal, and they offer an opportunity to learn and be better prepared.

You’re better positioned to persevere when you rely on what you know to be true, rather than succumbing to feelings that throw you off course. Focus on facts substantiated by your past.

Enjoy your work

Seek work that makes use of your interests and personality traits. If you have a vivid imagination, find a position that permits you to be creative. If you love people, assume a role that allows you to foster strong relationships. If you’re analytical, take a job solving complex problems. Duties that align with your interests and values will fulfill you. These traits are God given. They are an invitation towards your best. They are the fingerprint of God you your person.

You can persevere when you love what you do. Not every aspect of your job may be gratifying, but if you enjoy your work, you’re more likely to push yourself when circumstances get tough.

Develop discipline

If you lack the discipline to stick to plans, you’ve probably encountered difficulties at work. Failing to stay the course disadvantages you and your people, who depend on you to do what’s best.

Develop contempt for complacency. Leading people is hard work. There are plenty of needs to address, even in highly effective organizations. Maintaining a well-run company takes discipline and trying to correct a struggling one takes even more. You can persevere with a disciplined approach to your duties. Keep yourself accountable, perhaps with a trusted colleague, mentor or professional coach, who holds you to your tasks, to stay on course. Don’t let yourself give up. Discipline is a character trait of a godly leader. Commit to grow in your disciplines: physical, spiritual, financial, intellectual, leadership and relational. Knowing that the most important discipline of all is the relational discipline with God. He is waiting.

What do you think? Do you struggle to persevere? How are you developing your perseverance? I’d love to hear from you.  I can be reached here marc@mocoach4ldrs.com and on LinkedIn.